My New Best Friend – Refrigerator Dough

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Refrigerator Potato Rolls from EatinontheCheap.com

When I started on the journey to frugality, I did my research first. I Googled for weeks trying to find the definitive source for how to live on as little as possible. The book that came up at almost every single source was The Tightwad Gazette by Amy Dacyczyn ( pronounced decision). So I bought it off of Amazon – a very spendthrift thing to do – and read it from cover to cover. All 927 pages. Twice. Along with the rest of the priceless advice in this book was the mention of a Betty Crocker recipe for Refrigerator Dough. It was made with mashed potatoes, could be made into anything from cinnamon rolls to pizza crust, and best of all it would keep in the fridge for a week!
I went in search of this recipe and found several different versions, but finally came across one copied directly from a pre-1986 Betty Crocker cookbook. In the hopes that this dough could solve all of the world’s problems, I made my first batch this week. Assembly is very easy and quick. After you mix and knead the dough you are pretty much done for the week. It makes a light dough with a somewhat crunchy outside and a moist inside. It’s just as good ( actually a lot better) than Pillsbury from a can. I’m not saying it will solve all of your problems, but it will make your week easier.

Here we go:

1 pkg. active dry yeast
1 ½ c. hot water
1 c. leftover unseasoned mashed potatoes or instant mashed potatoes prepared to = 1 c.
2/3 c. sugar
2/3 c. shortening (do not use oil)
2 eggs
1 ½ t. salt
6 to 7 c. all-purpose flour

Dissolve yeast in warm water in large bowl. Stir in potatoes, sugar, shortening, eggs, salt, and 3 c. of the flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in enough remaining flour to make dough easy to handle. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface, knead until smooth and elastic; about 5 minutes. Place in large greased bowl; turn greased side up. Cover bowl tightly; refrigerate at least 8 hours but no longer than 5 days.

From here you can make anything. Each time you pull the dough out of the fridge just punch down the dough and take out what you need. With one batch of dough I made 4 huge hamburger buns and two full sized pizza crusts. Here are my pizzas:

The pizza was great and the kids and I loved it. I’m not going to say that this rivals the crust of New York pizzerias but it beats bread in a can and it’s a lot cheaper too.

Here are instructions for all sorts of other kinds of bread made with this dough. Also feel free to substitute some whole wheat flour for all-purpose to make it healthier.

Brown-and-Serve Rolls: shape dough as directed in any recipe below. Let rise 1 hour. Heat oven to 275°. Bake 20 minutes (do not brown). Remove from pans, cool to room temperature. Wrap in aluminum foil and store in refrigerator no longer than 8 days or freeze no longer than 2 months. At serving time, pre-heat oven to 400°, bake until brown, 8 to 12 minutes.

Casseroles: shape ¼ of dough into 1-inch balls. Place in lightly greased round layer pan, 9 X 1 ½ inches. Brush with softened margarine, let rise 1 hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 minutes until golden brown. 3 dozen rolls.

Cloverleaf Rolls: shape ¼ of dough into 1-inch balls. Place 3 balls in each greased muffin cup. Brush with softened margarine, let rise one hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 – 20 minutes until golden brown. 1 dozen rolls.

Crescent Rolls: roll ¼ of dough into a 12-inch circle on a floured surface. Lightly spread with softened margarine. Cut into 16 wedges. Roll up tightly beginning at rounded edges, stretching dough as it is rolled. Place rolls with points underneath on a greased cookie sheet, curving slightly. Let rise one hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 minutes until golden brown. 16 rolls.

Fan Tans: roll ¼ of dough into a 13X9 inch rectangle on a well-floured surface. Spread with softened margarine. Cut lengthwise into 6 strips, each about 1 ½ inches wide. Stack strips evenly; cut into 12 pieces, each about an inch wide. Place cut sides down in greased muffin cups. Brush with softened margarine. Let rise one hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 – 20 minutes until golden brown.
1 dozen rolls.

Four-Leaf Clovers: shape ¼ of dough into 2-inch balls. Place each ball into a greased muffin cup. With scissors, snip each ball completely into halves, then into quarters. Brush with softened margarine. Let rise one hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 – 20 minutes until golden brown. 1 dozen rolls.

Pan Biscuits: use half of dough recipe. Roll dough into 13X9 rectangle on a well-floured surface. Place in greased, oblong pan (13X9X2). Cut dough into rectangles, each about 3X2 ½ inches. Brush with softened margarine. Let rise one hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 25 minutes until golden brown. 15 rolls.

Parker House Rolls: roll ¼ of dough into a 12X9 rectangle on a well-floured surface. Cut into 3-inch circles with a floured cutter. Brush with softened margarine. Make a crease across each circle; fold so top half slightly overlaps bottom half. Press edges together. Place close to each other in a greased square 9X9X2 pan. Brush with softened margarine. Let rise one hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 – 20 minutes until golden brown. 1 dozen rolls.

Leftover Turnovers: prepare ¼ dough as if for Parker house Rolls. After cutting into 3-inch circles, roll out to 4-5 inch circles. Make crease, fill bottom half with 2-3 tbsp. of leftovers. Fold over and press edges together. Let rise 30 minutes. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 – 20 minutes until golden brown

My New Best Friend – Refrigerator Dough

Make ahead refrigerator dough is so convenient to have on hand for any day of the week.
Prep Time: 8 hours
Cook Time: 12 minutes
Total Time: 8 hours 12 minutes
Course: bread
Cuisine: american
Servings: 12 servings
Calories: 247kcal
Author: jodiemo

Ingredients

  • 1 pkg. active dry yeast
  • 1 ½ c. hot water
  • 1 c. leftover unseasoned mashed potatoes or instant mashed potatoes prepared to = 1 c.
  • 2/3 c. sugar
  • 2/3 c. shortening do not use oil
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 ½ t. salt
  • 6 to 7 c. all-purpose flour

Instructions

  • Dissolve yeast in warm water in large bowl. Stir in potatoes, sugar, shortening, eggs, salt, and 3 c. of the flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in enough remaining flour to make dough easy to handle. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface, knead until smooth and elastic; about 5 minutes. Place in large greased bowl; turn greased side up. Cover bowl tightly; refrigerate at least 8 hours but no longer than 5 days.
  • From here you can make anything. Each time you pull the dough out of the fridge just punch down the dough and take out what you need. With one batch of dough I made 4 huge hamburger buns and two full sized pizza crusts. Here are my pizzas:
  • The pizza was great and the kids and I loved it. I'm not going to say that this rivals the crust of New York pizzerias but it beats bread in a can and it's a lot cheaper too.
  • Here are instructions for all sorts of other kinds of bread made with this dough. Also feel free to substitute some whole wheat flour for all-purpose to make it healthier.
  • Brown-and-Serve Rolls: shape dough as directed in any recipe below. Let rise 1 hour. Heat oven to 275°. Bake 20 minutes (do not brown). Remove from pans, cool to room temperature. Wrap in aluminum foil and store in refrigerator no longer than 8 days or freeze no longer than 2 months. At serving time, pre-heat oven to 400°, bake until brown, 8 to 12 minutes.
  • Casseroles: shape ¼ of dough into 1-inch balls. Place in lightly greased round layer pan, 9 X 1 ½ inches. Brush with softened margarine, let rise 1 hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 minutes until golden brown. 3 dozen rolls.
  • Cloverleaf Rolls: shape ¼ of dough into 1-inch balls. Place 3 balls in each greased muffin cup. Brush with softened margarine, let rise one hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 - 20 minutes until golden brown. 1 dozen rolls.
  • Crescent Rolls: roll ¼ of dough into a 12-inch circle on a floured surface. Lightly spread with softened margarine. Cut into 16 wedges. Roll up tightly beginning at rounded edges, stretching dough as it is rolled. Place rolls with points underneath on a greased cookie sheet, curving slightly. Let rise one hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 minutes until golden brown. 16 rolls.
  • Fan Tans: roll ¼ of dough into a 13X9 inch rectangle on a well-floured surface. Spread with softened margarine. Cut lengthwise into 6 strips, each about 1 ½ inches wide. Stack strips evenly; cut into 12 pieces, each about an inch wide. Place cut sides down in greased muffin cups. Brush with softened margarine. Let rise one hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 - 20 minutes until golden brown.
  • 1 dozen rolls.
  • Four-Leaf Clovers: shape ¼ of dough into 2-inch balls. Place each ball into a greased muffin cup. With scissors, snip each ball completely into halves, then into quarters. Brush with softened margarine. Let rise one hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 - 20 minutes until golden brown. 1 dozen rolls.
  • Pan Biscuits: use half of dough recipe. Roll dough into 13X9 rectangle on a well-floured surface. Place in greased, oblong pan (13X9X2). Cut dough into rectangles, each about 3X2 ½ inches. Brush with softened margarine. Let rise one hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 25 minutes until golden brown. 15 rolls.
  • Parker House Rolls: roll ¼ of dough into a 12X9 rectangle on a well-floured surface. Cut into 3-inch circles with a floured cutter. Brush with softened margarine. Make a crease across each circle; fold so top half slightly overlaps bottom half. Press edges together. Place close to each other in a greased square 9X9X2 pan. Brush with softened margarine. Let rise one hour. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 - 20 minutes until golden brown. 1 dozen rolls.
  • Leftover Turnovers: prepare ¼ dough as if for Parker house Rolls. After cutting into 3-inch circles, roll out to 4-5 inch circles. Make crease, fill bottom half with 2-3 tbsp. of leftovers. Fold over and press edges together. Let rise 30 minutes. Heat oven to 400° and bake about 15 - 20 minutes until golden brown

Nutrition

Serving: 2g | Calories: 247kcal | Carbohydrates: 29g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 13g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 27mg | Sodium: 81mg | Potassium: 226mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 13g | Vitamin A: 40IU | Vitamin C: 16mg | Calcium: 10mg | Iron: 0.4mg
Tried this recipe?Mention @TwoLuckySpoons or tag #twoluckyspoons!

jodiemo

Jodie is a wife, mom, writer and lover of chickens and gardens. She runs her family's winery by day and cooks and writes by night.

This Post Has 7 Comments
  1. Thank you! I have been looking everywhere for this, and I was never able to find that old a copy of the BC cookbook. (Even the library copies are newer editions.)

  2. Do you know if the refrigerator dough would make things like hotdog and hamburger buns, pancakes, raised tortillas, calizones and doughnuts? Would you say it was worth trying it? I’d probably use it all the time if I could save money making those practical things. the cheapest hotdog buns I can buy are 89 cents, whereas if I could make them myself, they’d be more like five cents. That’s a lot of savings that could be put towards the new roof and paying off car repairs.

    1. You can definitely make all kinds of things with this dough ( maybe not tortillas). I’d say give it a shot and see how you like it!

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